21st September 2021
By Roland Sebestyén
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A new study found there could be a link between cannabis use and a syndrome that results in uncontrollable vomiting after recreational use was legalised in some part of the United States.

According to Yahoo, emergency departments in Colorado have reported a growing number of patients with uncontrollable vomiting, also known as cyclical vomiting syndrome (CVS) over the last few months.

Between 2013 and 2018, Colorado saw more than 800,000 people being admitted to hospital wards for CVS. The report suggests that the numbers were growing after cannabis was legalised in the state in 2012.

The researchers said vomiting can be a symptom of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS), a syndrome that occurs among heavy, long-time cannabis users.

The study authors concluded: “The findings of this study suggest that cannabis legalisation in Colorado is associated with an increase in annual vomiting-related health care encounters with regard to exposure to these markets. 

“It may be useful for health care clinicians to be aware of cannabis hyperemesis syndrome and inquire about cannabis use when appropriate.”

Another study in 2020 also suggested that one in five who were suffering from CVS were regular cannabis users.

This is not new. A few months ago, Canex already reported that “a new, mysterious condition”, which has been nicknamed “scromiting” as common symptoms reportedly include screaming and vomiting, has been on the rise in parts of the US where recreational cannabis has been legalised.

This rare side effect of cannabis use – described as a psychotic episode – has users across America severely vomiting and screaming uncontrollably. 

The condition’s official name is, unsurprisingly, cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS), but health care workers call it “scromiting”.

CHS could be real, and heavy users must be aware of this unpleasant condition that could result in hospital admission.

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