4th November 2021
By Roland Sebestyén
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As psychedelics are having their “renaissance” and even their medical use is becoming ever more accepted worldwide, we wondered: how long do ‘magic mushrooms’ stay in our system?

It must be noted that many psychedelics, such as LSD and “magic mushrooms”, are currently graded as a Class A drug according to the Misuse of Drugs Act (1971).

Drugs in this category are considered to “have no therapeutic value” and therefore they cannot be lawfully possessed or prescribed, and until now, research into the chemicals has been somewhat restricted.

However, according to a 2016 survey,  more than 12,000 people used psilocybin hallucinogenic mushrooms in the UK – a number that is believed to have continued to grow in recent years.

Notably, according to the results of the survey, “magic mushrooms” were also regarded as “one of the safest drugs in the world.”

What is psilocybin?

Psilocybin is a psychedelic substance that is found in a small number of fungi, often referred to as ‘magic mushrooms’.

These mushrooms have become well-known, however for the past half-decade, they have largely been associated with recreational drug use, hippy culture and anti-establishment groups. There is comparatively little awareness of the health and therapeutic potential of the substance.

Will “magic mushrooms” be legalised in the UK?

Not so fast. There is no sign that recreational use will be made legal in the UK any time soon. Even though there are some states and cities/towns in the US where psilocybin has been decriminalised, the UK is still miles behind in the topic.

It is already a massive step that prime minister Boris Johnson announced that he will examine the latest advice and consider the increasing calls to legalise psilocybin.

Furthermore, according to the Tory MP Crispin Blunt, Mr Johnson had already approved the rescheduling of psilocybin months ago but the Home Office is yet to act as it was instructed.

Mr Blunt said psilocybin should be listed as a Schedule II drug, to allow further medical and scientific research into the potential benefits of its use.

What happens if you use “magic mushrooms”?

The effects of psilocybin can differ from person to person. Many have reported experiencing feelings of euphoria and gaining new insights. In some cases, these insights have been claimed to be life-changing. On the other hand, however, other people may experience a ‘bad trip’

The likelihood of experiencing these different experiences can depend on a lot of different factors. The amount you digest; your age, the species of the mushroom, and your overall health can all influence how psilocybin will be tolerated – and on how long it will stay in your system.

According to Medical News Today, there is not an exact timetable in which psilocybin leaves the body, but the general experience is that the substance is not usually detectable in the blood, urine, or saliva 24 hours after consumption.

However, Drug Rehab says it cannot be detected after the 13th hour, but traces of “magic mushrooms” could stay in the hair up until 90 days.

It’s really hard to determine how long it will stay in the system; there are just too many factors.

One thing is for sure: the more you consume, the longer it stays in your system.

While we cannot approve the use of illegal drugs, there is growing evidence to support the use of psychedelics for the controlled treatment of various medical conditions, including depression and addiction.

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